Archive for June, 2009

Rain and shine

Saturday, June 27th, 2009

plot layout 8

As ever, thanks to Charles for the most recent plants of Red and Savoy cabbage and Armoria lettuce. We should be picking leaves in about two weeks from the lettuce. We can’t believe our luck with the weather, it is raining at all the right times.

In the middle bed we have planted Cardoons, Gobo Niza, and will try blanching as this may make the large leaves of less use to slugs. Cardoons grow to about six feet. Alongside are 10 Sweetcorn Seville.

Some names we’ve uncovered of Hadspen’s fields, features, nooks and crannies: Withy Bed, Thistle Furlong, Butt’s Copse, Poor Ground Copse, Cattle Throat, Blacklands, The Cold Bath, Long Walk, Cattle Hill, the Escarpment, the Hanging, Snipe Marsh, Orchard Wicket, Old Sawpit, Barberlands, Hanging Hemsdon, Larch Copse, Twelve Acres, Rattle hill, Knap, Criddlescombe.

Orache 25 June

Orache 25 June

Courgette Soleil 25 June

Courgette Soleil 25 June

Edges

Sunday, June 21st, 2009

The lovely fencing hurdles provide a nice edge to the plot (thanks Paul!). We plan to to espalier an apple tree to each, Ashmeads Kernal – a variety recommended by Charles Dowding. One of the Black Hamburgh vines has got scorched on two of its newest leaves where they touch the wall; we’re endeavoring to find out why. The Black Hamburg variety is the famous (more…)

Beds made

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009

plot-layout-7.436-1

The compost from Dimmer seems to be working well. To begin with, we put three inches on each of three beds, covered the whole lot with porous paper ground cover. After two weeks we added three to four inches on top of the paper and planted directly into that. So in three weeks we’ve gone from a clover site to a productive plot. The plants may struggle as they will have to compete, at first, with the still viable clover underneath.

Compost from Viridor at Dimmer, Castle Cary, 01963 350 743. £15 per ton.

Hay baled 17 June

Hay baled 17 June

Settling in

Saturday, June 13th, 2009

The plants are loving it. One of them will be familiar to those who knew the Pope’s garden: Orache (Atriplex Hortensis), also called Red Orach, Mountain/French Spinach, or Saltbush, is an annual leaf vegetable with, fairly obviously, a spinachy salty taste. We have read that sheep grazed on saltbush have surprisingly high levels of vitamin E . . .

The remains of the day, 13 June 2009

The remains of the day, 13 June 2009

Positioning the hurdle

Positioning the hurdle

House Pen

House Pen, commissioned by Fausto, built by Hilary, Min as lead consultant

The first three beds

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

In less than a month from starting, the bottom beds are planted. The first compost went on as recently as 26 May. Numerous thanks to Charles Dowding for advice, encouragement and, not least, the plants. Foremost though, thanks to Niall and Penelope Hobhouse for the the privilege, and allowing us through the gate in the first place. Let’s see what the plants make of it.

As of 11 June

As of 11 June

The black stuff from Dimmer

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

 

The black stuff from Dimmer @ £15 per tonne. Three tons each by wheelbarrow.

Six tonnes on the lower three beds.

 

First steps

Tuesday, June 9th, 2009

The first two plants in the ground on 30 May are Black Hamburgh (or Hambro’) vines. Thanks to Jacky and Brian of Wraxall Vineyard for their help.

An original label in the walled garden c. 1850
An original label in the walled garden c. 1850

 

Test drive

Tuesday, June 9th, 2009

This blog is newly born and finding its feet. Forgive us while we develop the look, feel and smell, write some devilishly witty and informative prose and learn how this publishing tool works.

Adding compost 26 May

Tuesday, June 9th, 2009

The first compost goes on

The first compost goes on